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Queen Key talks 'Eat My Pussy Again,' female empowerment in hip hop and more

Preezy Brown

 // Jun 10, 2019

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The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organization, employer or company.


Men holding a monopoly over the microphone when it comes to sexuality and gender roles in hip hop culture is one that is currently being flipped, as 2019 has marked the arrival of a new brigade of women taking ownership of the conversation. One artist who is at the forefront of this change is Queen Key, who's quickly rising up the ranks in Chicago's local scene and is on verge of becoming the city's next household name.

First making waves with her late 2015 single "Baked As A Pie," Queen Key -- whose songs are littered with a balanced mix of humor, overt sexual innuendo and boss bitch musings -- released a pair of acclaimed mixtapes (Your Highness 1 & Your Highness 2) before releasing her 2018 EP, Eat My Pussy. As provocative as the title is, Key's appeal extends further than her shock value, as her lyrical ability and wit are as sharp as her tongue when appraising rivals, and lackluster men.

Fresh off the release of her latest project, Queen Key looks to put fans on notice that her eyes are on the throne. REVOLT spoke with Queen Key to get the backstory on the making of her new album, her views on men, the role women play in Chicago's rap scene, and leading the charge for female empowerment. Peep the conversation below.



You recently released your new project Eat My Pussy Again, which is a sequel to your breakout EP. How does it feel to get a new body of work out to the public?

It feels great 'cause I really been waiting on these songs to just be out into the world. And I really put my all in this project. So yeah, it feels great.

With the title of the first edition stemming from a comment made on social media, what inspired you to reprise it for this go-round?

I just feel like it really made sense for the most part. If somebody eats my pussy, they gonna eat it again (laughs). It just made sense.

The production on this project conveys an array of moods and jumps out at the listener. How would you describe your process when picking what beats to rhyme over?

I really was just looking for different types of songs, period. Like different songs that [were] still me, though. I was kinda just going off my moods.

One collaboration on the album that stands out is 'Who Am I,' which features Grand Hustle artist Tokyo Jetz. What was it like working with her and how did the two of you initially connect?

I made 'Who Am I' and I had left an open verse [on it]. Then, I thought about Tokyo and shit [as a feature]. I sent her the song, she got it back to me in no time. She killed it.

Aside from two songs, Eat My Pussy Again is devoid of features. Was that a conscious decision on your part or did that happen organically?

Yeah, it was. I wasn't gonna do any features, but it just so happened that I really liked them songs that I got [with them]. And I fuck with them as artists, Kidd Kenn and Tokyo. The first EP had hella features or whatever, so I just felt like I needed to show more of my message.



'Like Me Better' has an air of honesty that reveals your subtle vulnerabilities. What inspired you to make that song and put your insecurities on front street?

I feel like it was just me being honest. Just a lot of shit was going on and I just wasn't liking it, and I was realizing what I like better. So, I needed to address that for myself and for people that can relate.

Listening to Eat My Pussy Again and past releases, you seem to be unconcerned with romance or the idea of a monogamous relationship. How would you describe your attitude toward men at this point in your life?

I ain't really taking no shit. I'm super picky right now. I'm really at a point where men gotta earn my respect simply because I know my worth and I know who I am.

The most sobering moment on the album is 'Ms. Understood,' which showcases your more introspective side. What's the backstory behind the creation of that song and how would you describe your mind-state while recording it?

Well, the beginning part, that was a poem I wrote my sophomore year in high school. And then the rest of the song, it was a song I made, I just never dropped it. And then the hook part, the 'Ms. Understood, but it's all good,' that was the new part I made like last year. I just heard the beat and it came together.

Out of all the songs on the album, which three are you most excited for fans to hear and why?

That's really hard, honestly. But, I guess I'd say I like 'Like Me Better,' 'RBA,' and 'Bad 2 da Bone' or 'Substitute.'

What was your mission making this project and do you feel like you've accomplished it?

My mission was pretty much message and purpose. And yeah, I think I accomplished it and I'm still accomplishing it because more women listen to it. I feel I pretty much got my message out there, the message is pretty clear in the fucking songs. That's how I feel and that's my message.



In recent years, there's been a rise in female rappers promoting empowerment among women and flipping the script on the misogynistic views men in rap have had toward women for years. How does it feel to be a part of this current renaissance for women?

It feels great, it's no surprise. I was one of the first ones talking shit about niggas out of this new generation of female rappers, so yeah, it feels good. It's what I do. I don't even feel like it's something that I necessarily joined, it's how I came out. So, it just feels good to see that other girls and women agree with me.

Are there any female rappers in the game you've been able to connect with personally and build a rapport with?

Yeah, a lot of them, most of them. I've met a few of them that I actually talk to and party with like Dreezy, Megan, Young Baby Tate. I'm cool with Rico, cool with Malibu Mitch. That's all I can think of right now. But, pretty much everybody.

Chicago's rap scene became an epicenter in hip hop during this decade by producing some of the biggest young stars in rap. What was it like seeing Chicago go from being on the back-burner to being a powerhouse and breeding ground for rising talent, as a new artist yourself?

I think it's amazing. And we're still growing and we're just getting bigger and better, period. The music scene definitely needs us.

There's also been a number of female rappers from The Chi making big waves nationally. How would you describe the role women have played in molding the Chicago rap scene?

I think we're all very cold because we're all different. So, I think that's necessary, that's important. That's raw shit, I like that. Even though we're all similar in whatever way, we're different, though. As far as style, image and everything. I think that's cool.



You're currently signed to Machine Entertainment Group, which also houses fellow Chicago rapper G Herbo. How would you say your experience working with the label and more established label-mates like Herbo has helped your own career and creative process?

It helped me a lot because I'm learning a lot. I'm learning how things go, I'm learning, like, just the inside of stuff. It's helped me in a sense of learning like a motherfucker.

Eat My Pussy Again is currently on the agenda for you. Do you have any plans to get on the road and tour any time soon?

Yeah, I do actually. I'm not sure exactly when. But yeah, I definitely plan on doing a tour very soon.

What's next for Queen Key, musically or otherwise?

Pretty much everything, shit. Just hella raw music. Raw visuals. Queen Camp, I started a non-profit. It's like a group of girls, we do a lot of different shit. So yeah, people can definitely be looking out for Queen Camp.


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